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How to Fund a Creative Project without Going Broke...

How to Fund a Creative Project without Going Broke (Risk + Money)

Big announcement! Oh My Dollar’s cat-filled purrsonal finance book, A Cat’s Guide to Money, is going into the second printing, and we need your help to make that possible. But don’t worry, this episode isn’t just going to be about the book – it’s also about why I chose to go the crowdfunding route again, and what that has to do with risk and money.

We talk about these things:

All about the campaign

You can find out more about it the campaign at ohmydollar.com/cats And if it doesn’t make sense for you, that is 100% fine. But if you’re able to share it on social media, that goes a LONG way towards helping us out. Shares mean a lot in these campaigns – most of our backers last time came through our podcast listeners!

 

Ask us a question!

We love hearing from you! Email us your financial worries or how you’ve tackled risk or cat pictures questions@ohmydollar.com or tweet us at @anomalily or @ohmydollar

This show is made paw-sible by listeners like you

We absolutely love our Purrsonal Finance Society Members, the folks that generously support Oh My Dollar with $1 or more a month on Patreon – and have made is so we have free, full transcripts for every show on ohmydollar.com

This episode was underwritten by patron Tamsen G Association. To learn more about being part of the Purrsonal Finance Society and get cool perks like exclusive livestreams and cat stickers, you can visit ohmydollar.com/support

Other Episodes You Might Find interesting

 

Transcript (provided by our listener supporters on Patreon)

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Will Romey:
This show is supported by generous listeners like you through our patreon. This episode was underwritten by the Tamsen G Association and Chris Giddings.

Will Romey:
To learn more about ways to support Oh my dollar, and get cool perks like exclusive livestreams and a fancy special icon on our forums you can visit ohmydollar.com/support.

Lillian Karabaic:
Welcome to Oh My Dollar!, a personal finance show with a dash of glitter.

Lillian Karabaic:
Dealing with money can be scary and stressful. Here, we get practical, friendly advice about money that helps you tackle the financial overwhelm. I’m your host Lillian Karabaic.

Will Romey:
I’m your other host, Will.

Lillian Karabaic:
So this episode is mostly a big announcement episode.

Will Romey:
It’s an exciting announcement.

Lillian Karabaic:
I’ve been dropping if you follow me on any of the socials, on the Internet. I’ve been dropping pretty large- “You can drive through them”-sized hints for the past like month. But, Oh My Dollar!’s cat-filled purr-sonal finance book is going into the second printing.

Will Romey:
Yes round two.

Lillian Karabaic:
Round two. And we need your help to make that possible. We are doing another kickstarter this time. Don’t worry! This episode is not going to just be all about the book.

Lillian Karabaic:
It’s not just all going to be hashtag #spon.

Lillian Karabaic:
I also thought it might be valuable to walk you through why I chose to go the crowdfunding route again, versus kind of some of the other options available to you.

Lillian Karabaic:
And what that has to do with my own kind of personal tolerance for risk and money. I thought it might give some folks some insight into, what their risk tolerance and kind of the way that you choose to do things – because one of the things we’ve talked about is like, personal finance is highly personal, and there’s often a lot of different paths to get to the same end results.

Will Romey:
A lot of ways to skin a cat.

Lillian Karabaic:
OWW! There’s a reason I know is that pun in the book.

Lillian Karabaic:
But like one of the reasons that you know, like, the end result is that I need to order another couple of thousand books, right? And it’s great news that we’ve already sold out.

Lillian Karabaic:
And there are a bunch of different paths to get there and some of those pass I just decided were closed to me because of my own personal risk tolerance.

Will Romey:
Aha. So like like what. What’s an example of what a path you didn’t want to take? So.

Lillian Karabaic:
So it’s going to cost about six thousand US $$ for me to do another print run of the book. And it’s still like a relatively small print run as it, as it is. But it’s it’s the size of a print run from like a small press would be in the States.

Lillian Karabaic:
I think I accidentally ended up running a small press. I think that’s my job.

Will Romey:
*Laughs.*

Lillian Karabaic:
And the one of the options kind of the traditional like financing option would be doing something, which is just quite simply how a lot of small businesses run their finances – which is get a credit card.

Lillian Karabaic:
I could have said like “Okay I’m going to -“.

Lillian Karabaic:
Banks are very interested in lending the money *laughs* They love lending me money because I have a great credit score and I have always paid back everything I’ve borrowed.

Will Romey:
So you’re good investment.

Lillian Karabaic:
I’m a good investment. And I was offered in 18 months with zero percent credit line which happens to be more than I need to do a print run of the books. And so there was part of me that was just very tempted to do that right? You know like, from the perspective of like, it’s pretty much low risk.

Lillian Karabaic:
I I have a good idea of how many books I sell in an average month.

Will Romey:
You wouldn’t have to do a whole Kickstarter campaign.

Lillian Karabaic:
And I wouldn’t have to do a whole Kickstarter campaign, which is real work right?

Lillian Karabaic:
Like not to mention like the emotional toll of coming back to your audience and being like “thank you for supporting us on patreon, thank you for buying the book last time if you did. But I need to raise money for another kick- print run.”

Will Romey:
Uh huh

Lillian Karabaic:
There was other ways to do it. There’s something called factoring, which if you follow economic news you might have heard of before – Have you heard of factoring?

Will Romey:
No. *giggles*

Lillian Karabaic:
Okay so a lot of times we’ll talk about like you know you hear the term like “overnight lending rate” which is like a federal government rate which is the lending rate set. It’s what – it’s part of what drives interest rates.

Lillian Karabaic:
And that is the rate that is set between banks lending each other money, cause banks at any given time actually don’t have all of the money that they have.

Will Romey:
right.

Lillian Karabaic:
So to speak and so they’re constantly lending money between them and also getting them from the overnight window at the Fed, which I’d just like to imagine is an actual window that banks go to.

Will Romey:
Just on the side of the White House.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah exactly.

Will Romey:
Federal Reserve hey we like to keep it independent.

Will Romey:
Do they have their own building?

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah.

Will Romey:
What branch of the government do they technically fall under?

Lillian Karabaic:
They are their own branch of the government, the Federal Reserve.

Will Romey:
Okay. They don’t then. Okay. Yeah. Drifting.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yes. No I mean that’s I think that’s a big thing is that the Federal Reserve is it’s not you know it’s supposed to be in totally independent agency – because you do while monetary policy can be influenced by politics, you want the Fed to set it.

Will Romey:
Anyway that I guess since the executive branch is nominating -.

Lillian Karabaic:
Tune into my forthcoming macroeconomics for Muggles web series to learn more about Federal Reserve interest rates.

Lillian Karabaic:
But OK, but there is this other type to get to get back to. I’m obviously not borrowing money from the Federal Reserve but- One thing that you can do is your distributors, so I have a distributor. They’re a relatively small distributor but that’s part of why I’m in retail stores all across the U.S.

Lillian Karabaic:
And they’re great they’ve been around for a long time. They deal with a lot of like smaller cutesy press books like mine, and one of the things I could have done is gotten done – gotten factoring and factoring is essentially where your distributors give you a loan. And factor rates, because factoring is very common and used in manufacturing businesses. It’s one of those things where I essentially would borrow money from my distributors at a factored rate. That’s kind of an oversimplification of it.

Will Romey:
And then almost the books you had pressed would be your collateral.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah. Yes yes yes exactly. And one of the reasons to do that is because you’re not borrowing money from a bank, you’re borrowing it you’re usually buying borrowing – it at like higher interest rates but you’re staying essentially within the industry.

Lillian Karabaic:
And that was one of the things that really made me nervous about borrowing credit money for this. B Banks know nothing about my business right. Like, they are not specialists in cat finance books and – or small press or really anything to do with my weird, weird job.

Will Romey:
Yeah.

Lillian Karabaic:
And they only want to lend me money because I am a Limited Liability Corporation which means that I personally, am the person in charge. Like If anything hits the fan,.

Will Romey:
They know who to point to

Lillian Karabaic:
I’m the one who’s who to pay it back. And it’s that’s why even though my business has its own credit score which is a thing that a lot of people don’t know but do.

Will Romey:
I didn’t know that.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah. If you’re a business viewer like a business checking account or whatever you do have your own credit score. It’s a lot harder to find or look up the same way that individual credit scores are with all of those free tools that you can get, like Credit Karma, Credit Sesame, the Discover cards.

Will Romey:
Interesting.

Lillian Karabaic:
But I. Both my business and me have great credit scores. So banks are willing to lend me money but that’s just because they know I’m gonna pay it back. Which speaks more to my credit “character”, so to speak, then it does to how likely it is going to sell those cat books.

Will Romey:
Right.

Lillian Karabaic:
And I’m like my distributor is great. They were essentially like a book sell consistently, like. What could we find a way to do this? I’m one of the reasons that they would benefit from doing that, is because they if I run another kickstarter campaign that’s essentially taking sales away from them. Right. So you know it because it’s, it’s me promoting it. And if I sell through them obviously they take a cut. If I sell through the Kickstarter they don’t. Does that make sense?

Will Romey:
Yeah yeah. I mean they’re there they are the middlemen who would be taking out of the operation if you do that course.

Lillian Karabaic:
And on the flip side I make a lot less money, when I sell through my distributor, but also like they’re great and they do the work right?

Will Romey:
Yeah. And you don’t do that work.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah. There’s no way I would be in as many retail stores as I was if I had to individually call up all those retail stores, and build relationships and send them books right?

Will Romey:
That’s another full time job. Yeah.

Lillian Karabaic:
They have all my distributors a whole warehouse you know versus my room.

Will Romey:
Your room, yea.

Lillian Karabaic:
I could have I could have incorporated as a partnership organization and gotten an investor. I am extremely lucky, that I do have access to people that have the kind of liquidity that would be necessary to fund another print run and I could’ve made them investors in the company.

Lillian Karabaic:
I could have just taken debt out from them or they could have just put the money in themselves and then gotten a percentage of the business – that would have involved reincorporating the business because my current structure does not allow for partners

Will Romey:
Because you’re the sole proprietor –

Lillian Karabaic:
Because it’s a sole proprietorship, which we’ve talked before on the show about like different business structures and how they how they work and-

Will Romey:
That’s a good example of that mattering. Not just being a you know how how you’re leading it, but butactually what you’re able to do and how you’re able to raise money.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah. And it’s it’s just like another. It’s also just more paperwork right? And if I do that that also means that I would be paying more in incorporation and tax fees, and if I did that it would not be what’s called a pass through entity, which means that the company would actually have to file its own tax return. Which is just another set of things I’d have to do every year right? So right now, I because it’s a pass-through entity. Everything ends up on my own taxes and my quarterly tax estimates are just paid by me the individual, even though a business is a real business, it’s a pass through entity written.

Will Romey:
That makes sense. I think we actually talked about that on a previous episode.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah yeah. I think we walk through the different incorporation structures so that that was another option.

Lillian Karabaic:
One of the reasons I chose not to do that is because, I have a lot of intellectual property tied up in my business that’s linked to me – and I didn’t want to have to hire lawyers to figure out the whole mess of that, right?

Will Romey:
Bringing more people into the business I’m sure would would muddy those waters.

Lillian Karabaic:
Exactly.

Lillian Karabaic:
And we’ve talked before about why that’s not why I’m not a 501c3 nonprofit. Because in many ways what we do is very nonprofit-y. A lot of our work. But the reason we’re not a 501c3, which is the nonprofit status in the states is because I would personally pretty much lose all of my interests in like the book I’ve created.

Will Romey:
So. That was another option.

Lillian Karabaic:
OK so how many options we walk through factoring, me taking out personal debt, Me taking money from an investor – either invested in the business or they lend me money individually.

Lillian Karabaic:
So one other option would been to alter the book so -.

Will Romey:
In what way?

Lillian Karabaic:
I emphasized for a long time the reason I did a Kickstarter for the first print run, is because I’m a print nerd and I like pretty things and I wanted to have gold foil and French fold flaps and a full color book right?

Will Romey:
And you got it.

Lillian Karabaic:
I got it and I’m- I knew that a mainstream publishing company would not, for a first time author do something that is kind of that expensive.

Lillian Karabaic:
Additionally, that wasn’t a lot of people get their books printed like print on demand? You know like where they’re digitally printed.

Lillian Karabaic:
The book had to be offset printed, because it’s full color with a bunch of illustrations. And because of that I had to do it offset printing, which means I had to raise capital. Lillian Karabaic: If you do print on demand

Will Romey:
Cat-pital.

Lillian Karabaic:
Cat-pital! You’ve got to work that one in.. But – so I had to raise enough to be able to do a print run, because essentially most of the cost of offset printing is a setup costs right?

Will Romey:
Right.

Lillian Karabaic:
So the actual copies don’t cost that much but there’s a lot of setup costs. You want to do as many as possible – versus print on demand which is digital so it’s just one book at a time.

Will Romey:
Oh I see.

Lillian Karabaic:
However, to print this book as it is currently, which is part of what I love about it is people pick it up an airport gift shops, and it’s the one to give to the reluctant friends.

Will Romey:
That looks nice.

Lillian Karabaic:
Never pick up a finance book because it’s cute. Well, I looked up how much it would cost to do this book as it exists even without like the gold foil on the cover. It would be 35 dollars a book and that’s the cost to me. So the book would have had to been over forty dollars for me to make any amount of money on the book, and that’s just frankly like I wanted to keep this book adorable but also affordable and the only way to do that was to do an offset print run.

Lillian Karabaic:
Or one of the other options was like I we’ve talked before, I do have an emergency fund, I have money in savings and I could personally, me as a person – lend my business money.

Will Romey:
Right? Oh that’s true, too.

Lillian Karabaic:
The thing was is that like, I have a fair amount in savings but I don’t have enough that I was comfortable lending what my business would have to pay me back over several months.

Will Romey:
And even as a reminder it goes right back to you, that’s that’s still a big gap.

Lillian Karabaic:
Right. Right. And just like it was going to it would eat into my emergency fund at this point. And one of the things I could have done, if I had realized I was gonna do a second print run for the book, I would have saved money from each book sale up – so that I wouldn’t have to do this.

Lillian Karabaic:
However, we’ve been in – I have a book agent, we’ve been in talks with like multiple publishing companies. And the thought was always that the second print run would be a third party publisher, not me. And that ended up not happening. And I’m like running out of books.

Lillian Karabaic:
And so we can’t wait for that – you know, publishing is a slow industry time deal. So like one option was it could’ve been just savings, but I decided that I was personally not willing to lend more money, especially because the business is my sole source of income now I work fully for myself. Thank you in no small part to our patreon supporters for the show.

Will Romey:
That makes that makes you definitely want to make sure you’ve get the stability of savings in an emergency fund.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah exactly like the emergency fund is so much more important, because all my income comes from Oh My Dollar! and I really did not want to put it into the business into a print run even though I know it’ll make me money right.

Lillian Karabaic:
I’m sure – I’m absolutely positive we’ll be able to pay it back before the end of the year, and then kind of the last, but so that those are many of the options. I think I’ve run through almost all of them.

Will Romey:
So those are their options we don’t want we’re going to take a break and then we’re going to come back and talk about the option you did go with. And the pros and cons of it.

Lillian Karabaic:
Our show is supported by listeners like you through our Purursonal Finance Society. You can find out more at ohmydollar.com/support and by advertisers like this. *SPARKLE*

Lillian Karabaic:
And we’re back.

Will Romey:
We’re back. Welcome back.

Lillian Karabaic:
So we walked through a lot of the different options that I didn’t do, and I don’t want people to feel like it’s bad to take any of those options. Those are all like valid options for funding something in your business.

Will Romey:
A number of those seem like they would have worked fine. Yeah. Despite having reasons against them but maybe not have been ideal for your specific situation.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah. And a large a large part of it came down to my own values. Like, I personally didn’t want to take out debt to fund another print run, even though I could do the numbers.

Lillian Karabaic:
I could sit back and the math everything that like a business economics background told me is like “this is the normal way to do business.” I don’t think debt is immoral or even really a bad way to access capital for small business – especially because I am in the privileged position where I have a good credit score, so I’m able to get it lended to me at zero percent right?

Lillian Karabaic:
So like from a purely mathematical standpoint, it made a lot of sense and it’s one of the most common ways to fund small business. But for for me, it was the idea that like it comes down to my own assets and if my business fails I, I can’t pay back my debts.

Lillian Karabaic:
And everyone told me like “entrepreneurs take risks” and you know “oh the founders of the airbnb funded their business off of like a flip book of credit cards They took out” and like “Don’t you want to be airbnb?”.

Lillian Karabaic:
For me this – this was it ended up being a values line, that I drew in the sand. I’ve been very lucky and just rampant with privilege that I haven’t had to take out consumer debt in the past.

Lillian Karabaic:
And for me this is something that’s genuinely just a value it’s a personal value. It’s not a judgment on other people and the choice to do that.

It’s just for me, it didn’t make sense to do that and I kind of realized that – one of the reasons I enjoyed doing the Kickstarter so much last time, was because while it is a ton of work to do compared to just, I don’t know swiping a credit card. It lets me talk to the actual people that might want to buy the book, and you know we were able to do some cool things when we did the Kickstarter. We will able to put people that backed its cats in the book so.

Will Romey:
Are real cat That was fun.

Lillian Karabaic:
Are actual cats! but also that –

Will Romey:
Shout out to cats.

Lillian Karabaic:
It also like we were able to shape the content of the book based on the readers that actually participated in or weekly read-along during, during the editing of the book. Like there is just so much that I gained value out of like, actually talking to the people that consume the product which is like a cool thing.

Will Romey:
And then when you were missing out if you had just taken out credit card debt-

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah well – Big Companies pay ton of money to talk to their actual consumers. And I’m lucky enough that I’m such a small business, that I’m able to actually just talk to my consumers by asking them to support it on Kickstarter.

Lillian Karabaic:
And I think one of the things I realized was that like they’re one of the myths that I was carrying around was that like this belief that people shouldn’t see the effort that you put into success. Like that if I ask for help, it discounts the work. That we shouldn’t you know we believe we shouldn’t “try too hard to succeed.”.

Lillian Karabaic:
That it’s not cool if we do, and you know like someone compliments your shirt and you’re like “oh this thing is so old, I found it in a trash heap in a flaming pile”.

Lillian Karabaic:
You know you can’t like take a compliment about your work unless you downplay the work that you put into it like “oh congratulations on that press in National Geographic, How did you do it?”.

Lillian Karabaic:
“I have no idea. They must have wanted someone to look bad.”.

Lillian Karabaic:
Like that’s an actual example from my life like – not that I was a national geographic, right? Someone else.

Will Romey:
Not yet.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah. *Fake national geographic voice* “This this woman likes to document finances with cats.”

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah. So I – realized that part of it was that I was carrying around kind of dysfunctional money values, that were preventing me from doing what I thought was probably the best way to fund this print run. Which was going back to people and be like “Hey do you wanna buy this thing?”

Will Romey:
Yeah well I seem to have worked well the first time.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah yeah. And I guess I’m worried of course that like everybody who wants the book, already has the book. But there are a bunch of other things that we’re doing with the kickstarter, that I’m really excited about so we’re doing our first ever wall at a glance calendar.

Lillian Karabaic:
So it’s actually like a poster you can see all of the days of the year on the wall.

Lillian Karabaic:
It has some adorable cats on the bottom it has the tax deadlines on it for quarterly tax filing you know the most important holidays.

Will Romey:
That’s cool. So is it for 2019?

Lillian Karabaic:
It’s going to be July through July.

Lillian Karabaic:
So and we’ll probably do another print run, for next year, if people like.

Will Romey:
That’s a neat idea.

Lillian Karabaic:
But let’s make sure people actually like it. And then we also have a mini budget planner which I’m really excited about. It’s locally printed here in Portland. You know I’m a stationery nerd, Will.

Will Romey:
Are there cats on it?

Lillian Karabaic:
and there will be cats, of course. There will be cats of course. And it’s like a cute little pocket planner. So I’m excited about that rather than like another big honkin book.

Will Romey:
No, I like the small planners. I often use my my fanny pack on my bike, and I can’t fit big planters in it.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yes. So you need a tiny, tiny budget planner.

Lillian Karabaic:
And I’m one of those people like I’ve talked before about. I really like paper when connecting with my budget because it feels more tangible to me and also it makes it feel like a fun thing to do to me because I like pretty stationery products.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah versus slaving away in front of a computer.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yes but just looking at a spreadsheet all day. So yeah, I’m, I’m really excited about it. We’re also doing some other cool things. One, we’re fixing the six typos that were in the book that keep me up at night.

Will Romey:
You know what they are?

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah I mean, but I’m not going to point them out. People could find them on their own or ideally don’t find them.

Will Romey:
Find that seventh one, and get a special prize.

Lillian Karabaic:
And while, there isn’t the opportunity to get your cat in the book again. We are doing special clear planner stickers and you can get one based on your cat.

Will Romey:
If so you can put your cat in the book. Oh that’s fun. Or wherever else. Any book.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah. You can just edit your cat into part of the book or anywhere you’d like.

Lillian Karabaic:
Which I’m really excited about. I also have been wanting to do those clear planner stickers because I have a lot of them. But I’ve been wanting to do them with Oh My Dollar! cats for a long time. So like they’re gonna have some cool like payday trackers and stuff like that for planner stickers.

Lillian Karabaic:
And the coolest part like the thing that made my heart soar last time was that we gave people the opportunity to get an e-book copy the book, and then buy one for the low-income youth that I work with.

Will Romey:
Oh nice.

Lillian Karabaic:
And through that over 200 low income young adults got a copy of the book and that was just due to the generosity of the Oh My Dollar! community. And it was amazing, I was able to deliver them all with in-person education.

Will Romey:
THat’s awesome.

Lillian Karabaic:
Homeless transitional youth center for GLBTQ+ youth here, to AmeriCorps members and also to some other folks in the community. And it was just really awesome. And we’re going to be doing that again.

Will Romey:
Oh that’s super!

Lillian Karabaic:
You can always donate if you’ve already got a copy and you want to donate one can, on you can donate one on to low income young adults.

Will Romey:
That’s a good way to support the Kickstarter.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah.

Will Romey:
So that’s exciting and all sounds great. What does the Kickstarter start?

Lillian Karabaic:
It starts right now. So if you’re listening to the show, we have already launched the Kickstarter.

Will Romey:
BAM! There it goes.

Lillian Karabaic:
If you want to find out more, you can – Also if you just maybe want to watch the video with cute cats in it, you can check it out at ohmydollar.com/cats. It would really help us out if, if you can’t participate in the Kickstarter for financial reasons or you just don’t want more stuff in your life, it still really helps if you share it. Just so other folks know about it.

Will Romey:
M hmm.

Lillian Karabaic:
And maybe just maybe that friend, that’s are always borrowing money from you will see it and get some cats and they will stop being broke.

Will Romey:
Stop hitting you up for ten bucks at the bar.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yes exactly.

Lillian Karabaic:
And no pressure, but I hope you like it. I’m really proud of the stuff that we did on it. And I also hope this was interesting, for some insight into like small business finances for folks that are maybe in this position.

Will Romey:
I’d be interested in hearing about how other people have done similar things – if they did take the Kickstarter option and or factoring – how that worked out.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah. I’m really curious like if you do run a small business, if you’ve done merch for bands, whatever it is. How do you how do you do it? How do you do the print run? Are you are you someone who’s putting everything on credit cards? Were you borrowing money from friends or family?

Will Romey:
A combination.

Lillian Karabaic:
A combination, all of the above. Did you did you? You know – I know I don’t know what other things.

Will Romey:
What other things did you do?

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah they like I know Airbnb, the founders. I keep bringing them up but they have like weird financing methods. But one of the things was they sold like Cheerios based on Obama called Obama O’s during the elections.

Will Romey:
Oh because they had O’s. Genius

Lillian Karabaic:
Oh and they like sold them and like used them as a way to finance the initial server costs or something. I don’t know.

Will Romey:
Cunning.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah very cunning.

Will Romey:
Then they wrecked a bunch of housing markets.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yes.

Will Romey:
Step two.

Lillian Karabaic:
Step two- step three. the step two with the ?? was Airbnb.

Lillian Karabaic:
The first step Obama O’s.

Lillian Karabaic:
Second step. ??

Lillian Karabaic:
Third step wreck housing markets in –

Will Romey:
In these towns..

Lillian Karabaic:
Hey Airbnb if you want to sponsor us, no shade we love you.

Will Romey:
Yeah yeah I like all. I like living next to all the airbnb houses I live next to. I’m concerned about the long term economics but they’re fine as neighbors. They don’t complain about noise.

Lillian Karabaic:
I definitely, I will not give up the address, but when I was in New York I stayed at an airbnb, and it was like in a Bushwick artist’s loft, and it was definitely not meant to be like legally not just an Airbnb.

Lillian Karabaic:
I’m not sure people are asking us to sleep there.

Will Romey:
Not for human habitation.

Lillian Karabaic:
They had built these like plywood boxes and so it was me me and to other people’s, it was kind of like a hostel where you’re like staying.

Will Romey:
Weird.

Lillian Karabaic:
And also like the key I used to unlock it was definitely labeled “dog walker”, but I also like more than for like a relatively small warehouse studio building, there was like more than 50 different lock boxes, all of the gate out front of the building. And I was like how many people?

Will Romey:
Hilarious that’s sketch. I think my favorite sketch airbnb moment was a brand new hotel in Bratislava. That clearly just had not finished their licensing and were just airbnbing these like brand new furnished hotel suites.

Lillian Karabaic:
That’s pretty great.

Will Romey:
Yeah. It was cheap. Bratislava is very recommended. If anyone’s ever in Eastern Europe I loved that place.

Lillian Karabaic:
Well I think I think that just wraps up our show for today. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah.

Lillian Karabaic:
Now that you’ve got your Bratislava recommendations for hotels, and also hopefully you are excited about at least going to check out what cool merch we have. You can go to my ohmydollar.com/cats.

Lillian Karabaic:
The whole Kickstarter is only going to be running for three weeks.

Will Romey:
A short one.

Lillian Karabaic:
Yeah relatively short. So I’d I’d love to see you over there.

Will Romey:
Let’s do it. That wraps our show for today and we love hearing from you so e-mail us your financial worries and successes and questions at questions@ohmydollar.com Or you can tweet us at at @anomalily or @Ohmydollar

Lillian Karabaic:
Our producer for this episode is Will Romey, our intro music is by Aaron Parecki, and your host and personal finance educator is me, Lillian Karabaic. Thank you for listening. Until next time remember to manage your money, so it doesn’t manage you.

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